All posts by Ron Chase

Ron Chase

About Ron Chase

At age 70, Ron Chase is old. But, he’s not under the grass…yet. Retired from a career with the Internal Revenue Service, he has embarked on a new life as a freelance writer and tax consultant. Don’t be misled; in reality, he works a little and plays a lot. When not busy kayaking, canoeing, biking, mountain climbing and skiing, he sometimes finds time to write and assist his tax clients. A lifelong Mainer now living in Topsham, he is the recent author of The Great Mars Hill Bank Robbery, a biography of Vietnam War hero and bank robber Bernard Patterson.

A Peak Too Far

Nine of us slowly ascended snow and ice covered Hamlin Ridge in one of Maine’s most remote and rugged regions, Mount Katahdin massif in Baxter State Park. Probably the only realistic opportunity to achieve our collective goal to summit the two highest points in Maine, Baxter and Hamlin Peaks, the high elevation forecast was marginal […]

Winter in Baxter State Park

The most exciting and challenging winter mountaineering in Maine can be found in Baxter State Park. Baxter and Hamlin Peaks on the Mount Katahdin massif are the two highest points in the state. Imposing Knife Edge connects Baxter and Pamola Peaks. Arguably the state’s most exceptional ice climbing and backcountry skiing are found in the […]

Parlez-vous Anglais?

Quebec is a winter wonderland where outdoor sports flourish. Skiing, skating, mountaineering and other activities abound. However, a visit has challenges. My French is not very good. Actually, that’s not true. It’s pathetic. As a defense, I’ve perfected one French phrase, “Parlez-vous Anglais?” When unaccompanied by French speaking escorts in Quebec, I just ask that […]

Chowderheads Ski Hidden Valley

Chowderheads don’t like meetings. When Penobscot Paddle and Chowder Society (PPCS) meetings are required, members employ exceptional efforts to include recreation before reluctantly attending to business. Like any organization, the PPCS needs meetings to plan their schedule, review finances and discuss topical issues. Normally, that’s three times a year for the PPCS; winter, summer and […]

Leaky Capers on Bald Rock Mountain

Bald Rock Mountain in Camden Hills State Park was the first mountain I climbed in the winter. That less than illustrious escapade was almost exactly forty years ago. Located in Lincolnville in the northeastern sector of the park, at the time primary access to the summit was a trail that left Route One about a […]

Falling for Goose Eye

An old age question asked during my annual physical for about a decade, “Have you fallen during the past year?” It always seems like an astounding inquiry. I occasionally fall carrying my kayak or canoe up and down steep embankments. A couple of times a year, I fall off a bike. While there is rarely […]

Poetic Mount Megunticook

“Where the mountains meet the sea, “ is an oft-quoted phrase attributed to poet Edna St. Vincent Millay to describe the Camden Hills. Located in Camden Hills State Park, Mount Megunticook is the tallest of the Camden Hills at an elevation 1,385 feet. According to park literature, it is also the highest mainland mountain on […]

Cross Country Skiing is for Old People

You can still love an activity even if you’re not good at it. That’s true with cross country skiing and me. Beginning the sport in my forties, I’ve never progressed beyond mediocrity. Something I thoroughly enjoy, it’s gentler on my aging body than most other favored pursuits. The School of Medicine at the University of […]

A Fiery Tale on Ragged Mountain

A lot has changed since I started hiking Ragged Mountain in the 1970s. Part of a coastal mountain range called the Camden Hills, back then the only trail leading to the summit began in a pasture on the Gillette Road in Rockport. Crossing private properties, the path went through an evolution of closings and re-openings, […]

Racing Against the Storm on Bigelow Mountain

Except for three years in the Army, I’ve lived my entire life in Maine. One would surmise that after seven decades experiencing Maine winters, they wouldn’t come as a surprise. However, for some inexplicable reason the first significant winter storm always seems to catch me unprepared. I’m not alone. A few inches of white stuff […]