All posts by Ron Chase

Ron Chase

About Ron Chase

At age 70, Ron Chase is old. But, he’s not under the grass…yet. Retired from a career with the Internal Revenue Service, he has embarked on a new life as a freelance writer and tax consultant. Don’t be misled; in reality, he works a little and plays a lot. When not busy kayaking, canoeing, biking, mountain climbing and skiing, he sometimes finds time to write and assist his tax clients. A lifelong Mainer now living in Topsham, he is the recent author of The Great Mars Hill Bank Robbery, a biography of Vietnam War hero and bank robber Bernard Patterson.

Cycling Picturesque North Haven

My introduction to Maine coastal islands came when I was a young Revenue Officer with the Internal Revenue Service in 1973. Revenue Officer responsibilities did not make me particularly popular with independent island fishermen. The mission was to collect seriously delinquent taxes, often using harsh enforcement measures, and conducting preliminary investigations on those perceived to […]

Dead Weekend

A character in Kenneth Roberts’ historical novel Arundel remarked of the Dead River, “(It’s) no more dead than a bobcat after a rabbit.” Joining the Kennebec River in West Forks after sixteen miles of almost continuous Class I through IV whitewater, the Dead is in actuality the west branch of the Kennebec and one of […]

Leaping Ganoids on the Kennebec

Having grown up along the Kennebec River in Randolph and Gardiner, I have many special memories of that significant waterway and its history. Two youthful misadventures remain distinct. About sixty years ago three friends and I “borrowed” a rowboat and paddled upriver from the mouth of Togus Stream to Brown’s Island in Farmingdale on a […]

Elderly Adventures in Grand Lake Stream

In addition to an ever growing assortment of aches and pains, aging comes with at least a few benefits. For me, one has been the time to experiment with writing professionally. After retiring from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), I began exploring writing opportunities in earnest. To a large degree, it’s been a positive endeavor. […]

Sebago to the Sea

At age 70, I’ve reluctantly come to the realization that I’m not going to be able continue my prior level of athletic involvement indefinitely. I can envision a time when my outdoor activities will be limited to cross country skiing in the winter and biking during the remaining three seasons. They’re the only two sports […]

Navigating the Shrinking St. Francis River

Fellow retiree Brent Elwell and I met at Pelletier’s Campground in St. Francis on a warm spring evening. The rural northern Maine village is located at the confluence of the St. Francis and St. John Rivers about fifteen miles north of Fort Kent. The goal was to canoe the St. Francis and our journey would […]

Canoe Tripping Maine Rivers

Maine has many of the best canoe tripping rivers in the northeastern United States. The Allagash, St. John, Moose, St. Croix and East and West Branches of the Penobscot are probably the most famous. However, there are others worth considering. Canoe tripping was my introduction to paddle sports. I began with large northern Maine lakes […]

Growing Old in Whitewater

Many of the whitewater boaters that I paddle with began the sport thirty or forty years ago. Now, we’re in our sixties, seventies and a handful in their eighties. We’ve witnessed much of the evolution of the sport which first became popular nationally in the seventies. Many people including myself credit the whitewater adventures depicted […]

Whitewater Weekend

For many years, Penobscot Paddle and Chowder Society (PPCS) members have organized an April whitewater weekend in New Hampshire. Normally, several excellent whitewater rivers and streams in the southern central part of the state open in April offering exciting early season paddling opportunities. Popular Class III/IV runs include Contoocook, Ashuelot, Otter, Warner and Smith. This […]

Misadventures on Souadabscook Stream

Souadabscook Stream is one of Maine’s most popular early spring whitewater runs. While most of it is located in Hampden, the source is a collection of small ponds in the Hermon area. Beginning with several miles of calm water and mild currents before arriving at Manning Mill Road, the stream then turns into a tumultuous […]